Can Free VoIP Be Good?

Brett Harney VoIP

free VoIP vs hosted VoIP

The World Wide Web is a wonderful resource full of free stuff. Depending on your personal needs, a free VoIP service could work for you. But, there are still factors you should consider for a no-cost VoIP especially when contemplating Voice over IP for your workplace.

Thanks to it.toolbox.com, we can share some important factors that affect VoIP to help you determine the best option. VoIP was originally designed to cram as many calls as possible on a broadband connection. It wasn’t a great connection and call quality was pretty poor back in the day. But it did allow people to save money by using broadband to talk to others.

When it comes to VoIP, three factors affect call quality: bandwidth, codecs, and network congestion. This is where free isn’t always better comes into play.

Over the years, we’ve seen VoIP surpass PSTN (public switched telephone network) calls in quality due to the wide availability of broadband and use of the proper codec.

You may think you have a solid network, but what happens on a VoIP call when your kids are streaming games or staff members are on various web conferences? And wireless networks can become touchy if there is interference around. Your neighbors’ wi-fi networks or even your appliances can block a signal. Old firmware and even older Bluetooth devices can also interfere with your signal.

Free isn’t usually a wise choice for businesses. There are reasons things are free out there and you wouldn’t want to chance walking down the wrong path without a map or at least asking which direction is best. Free VoIP doesn’t include support for voicemail, mobility, call forwarding, auto-attendant, hunt groups, extensions, and call center features.

There are plenty of options for VoIP that can fit your company’s size and budget. Hosted voice is easily the more manageable and flexible option that allows you to achieve premium capabilities in technology while saving your business significant money in the long term. Consider that over time, more applications and evolving integrations will move toward more efficient and cost-effective methods of communication that VoIP can offer.